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Get informed about Ebola

Hazardous material cleaners disinfectant their personal protective equipment after working in the apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas, stayed.  (AP/LM Otero)

Hazardous material cleaners disinfect their personal protective equipment after working in the apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan, the Ebola patient who traveled from Liberia to Dallas, stayed. (AP/LM Otero)

By Alexis Miano

The current Ebola epidemic in West Africa is the  largest outbreak of the virus the world has seen, according to the Centers for Disease Control  (CDC).  The disease itself starts with a fever, headache and muscle pains. If this doesn’t worry you, the vomiting, diarrhea and bleeding from the eyes probably will.  BBC News states that 70 percent of West Africans with the disease die. While this disease is not airborne, it is highly contagious and could spread as easily as sharing a glass with those infected. The main problem with the disease is that the virus keeps showing up in different forms, making it more difficult for scientists to create a vaccine. There is no surefire cure for Ebola.

Polling several students at Delgado to see just how much they know about Ebola, Patrick, a former film student, said he was unaware of what the disease was, but was worried about it nonetheless. He said he was worried because he didn’t know where it started, but he knew it was serious. (Ebola was first discovered in 1976 in the Republic of the Congo, where it infected over 284 people).

A female student of radiology at Delgado said she didn’t know much about the virus except that is was “coming here.” Unfortunately, the Ebola virus has already found its way to the U.S. The CDC confirmed the first case on Tuesday Sept. 30 in Dallas,  found in a man traveling from West Africa. Carlos, an architecture major, said he thought Ebola was a virus that eats your skin out. In actuality, the disease deteriorates blood-clotting cells and ends in uncontrollable bleeding.

 The truth of the matter is all former cases of Ebola were typically found in one particular place for a limited span of time.  Now the virus is in multiple countries at once, including our own. According to CNN, 729 people have died from this disease, and more cases are occurring. So far, the only way to stop it is to isolate those infected.

 

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